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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
in connecticut today left at least 27 people dead, most of them young children. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the massacre, one of the worst mass killings in world history. >> woodruff: today brings back memories of past shootings, and revives the conversation about school safety and how to talk to children about violence, subjects we address once again tonight. >> warner: then, ray suarez profiles three young immigrants in the u.s. illegally and seeking a reprieve from deportation. >> my values and customs are now american. so, you know, the idea of getting kicked out to korea and never come back to the u.s., i just can't even imagine this >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> warner: and we examine the growing turmoil in egypt on the eve of a referendum vote on a new constitution. >> one of the major-- has been one between islimus and nonover the future of egypt and the character ofhe nation >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs new
, tragedy struck at a grade school in a small connecticut town. 20 of the 27 dead are children. we begin our coverage with president obama's emotional address to the nation this afternoon. >> we've endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years. and each time i learn the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children. and for the family its of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonigh
the connecticut massacre still raw, spencer michels looks at a california law that aims to head off such violence. >> reporter: though no one knows the diagnosis of the perpetrator of the shootings in newtown, the killings have raised once again the issue of forcing the mentally ill into treatment. >> warner: as congress comes back to washington to resume fiscal cliff negotiations, we ask, what happens if they don't reach a deal? >> ifill: we talk with a representative of egypt's muslim brotherhood about the new brotherhood-backed constitution signed into law today. >> warner: and we have another of our conversations with retiring members of congress. paul solman sat down with the always outspoken massachusetts democrat barney frank. >> the notion that people would not go along with an important public policy because i hurt their feelings, i don't think that's true. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the goinsupport othese institutio and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation
shootings. it's not known if the gunman in newtown, connecticut suffered from mental illness. but the man who shot four firefighters in webster new york this week-- killing two of them who were remembered at a procession yesterday-- left a disturbing note in which he pledged to burn down the neighborhood and quote "do what i like doing best, killing people." politicians and commentators have used these and prior attacks to call for improved mental health screening and treatment. but one such program in california has proven hard to implement, as newshour correspondent spencer michels reports. >> i wanted the world to know what a wonderful, incredible person she was. >> reporter: for more than a decade, nick and amanda wilcox have been advocating timely treatment and early intervention for the severely mentally ill in the hopes they won't become violent. twelve years ago, their 19-year old-daughter laura wilcox, a college sophomore, was murdered by while she was working over christmas break at a mental health clinic in nevada county, california. >> at about 11:30 a client at the clinic cam
ends are these mass shootings. the terrible shooting in the elementary school in connecticut just this month. aurora, colorado, earlier this year. how do you know whether that is something that is going to mark this year, one way or another? >> well, one way to look at it is does it really lead to political change? other horrible catastrophes and school shootings really did not particularly. this one seems to have really struck people from the president on down in a way that we may in the next number of months see action on things like mental health, public safety, tv violence, maybe, and certainly gun control that might not have happened before. so presumably that was a turning point. >> woodruff: richard, to have mass shootings, mass killings, be a mark of a turning point in american history? >> well, we have become almost inured to it, which is a horrible thing to even contemplate. and then what happened in newtown, well, it just took it to another whole level. you've seen reflected already in some early polling data. this is something that really seems to be where the ice is b
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)